Low Interest Rates: The Addictive Policy Drug of Choice

This piece was originally posted on the Lawrence Economics blog in 2012.  This version has been updated in many places; however, the effects discussed in that posting remain a major concern today.  Political pressure to not only keep interest rates low but to lower them further seem unstoppable, especially since the eventual economic consequences are not … More Low Interest Rates: The Addictive Policy Drug of Choice

Modern Monetary Theory (MMT): Not Modern, Nor Purely Monetary, Nor a Coherent Theory

The theory, such as it is, has two primary claims: Countries that print their own currencies need not default on excess debts. Inflation in the end can and must be controlled by raising taxes or cutting spending, sufficiently to soak up such printed money. Based on these claims, MMT advocates conclude that the US need … More Modern Monetary Theory (MMT): Not Modern, Nor Purely Monetary, Nor a Coherent Theory

Are U.S. Exchange Rates Too High, Too Low, or Just Right?

Currency exchanges rates between any two countries are determined by a variety of factors including their balance of trade and payments, capital flows (both restricted and unrestricted), and monetary policies.  In a recent posting on Conversable Economics, Timothy Taylor argued that “all exchange rates are bad” (meaning that they generate some negative consequences.)  Although this … More Are U.S. Exchange Rates Too High, Too Low, or Just Right?

Monetary Policy in an Age of Radical Uncertainty (reposting)

This commentary was originally posted on July 25th, 2016. Central bankers in all major developed economies have adopted NIRP, ZIRP, or near ZIRP policies.  The Bank of Japan and the European Central Bank now “offer” negative interest rates (NIRP) on deposits and project to do so for the foreseeable future.  The Bank of England and […]

More Monetary Policy in an Age of Radical Uncertainty (reposting)